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DC/FRAME: I Did It My Way

Allen Woods, otherwise known as the One Wheel Bandit, rides his bike around town, impressing every passerby with his one-wheeled magic.nCrowned Queen of the Underworld, a Black female gangster runs the most lucrative gambling ring in DC in the 1950s, and manages to keep the DC police in her back pocket.nA Chocolate Lens chronicles Steven Cummings’s photographic journey through a disappearing Black Washington.nOne of the only Black drivers in NASCAR forges an unlikely path from virtual racing to the sport’s penultimate series.

DC/FRAME: Rhythms of Resilience

Pepe Gonzalez (aka Spanish Joe), takes a walk through the neighborhood that raised him, and introduces the people that drove him to become one of DC’s most legendary bass players.nFierceness Served! The ENIKAlley Coffeehouse is a short documentary (34 minutes) on the history of a DC Black LGBTQ creative space active from the 1980s to the mid-1990s. The Coffeehouse was the epicenter of a cultural renaissance in literature, music, photography, film, visual arts and performance galvanized by local Black Queer artists, which has influenced LGBTQ artists of color internationally and intergenerationally.nThe Black Fire documentary recounts the story of the label’s founders and the musicians, producers and radio personalities they influenced. The film depicts iconic images of the 1970s and shows how the music and activism of that era shaped the terrain of independent music business and paved the way for innovative jazz and Afro-future creatives.

DC/FRAME: Lost & Found

American citizen Emad Shargi is taken hostage while visiting Iran, his country of birth, as a pawn in ongoing nuclear negotiations. His wife Bahareh and daughters are forced into unlikely roles to bring him home.nSolitude and community; aging and migration; local and world history in a single historic apartment building in Mt. Pleasant, Washington DC.nIn 1838, Jesuit priests sold 272 enslaved people in order to keep Georgetown University afloat. Six generations later, with the aid of digital DNA databases, their descendants are finding each other and regrowing their family trees.